Failte gu Fuadach nan Gaidhealt na h-Alba

Failte gu Fuadach nan Gaidhealt na h-Alba.
The Highland Clearances were a devestating part of the history of Scotland. For many it changed not only their way of life but also shaped the rural future of Scotland. Many villagers suffered at the hands of their landlords and tackmen and fought a desperate struggle to find a new life. Others managed to propser in a new life that never saw them return to Scotland again. Here is a resource that supports the documentation and historical value of this important area of Scottish history. You can follow in the footsteps of these villagers and find detailed descriptions and locations of the remains of some of the villages and townships through site descriptions, photographs and suggestions for further reading and links to follow.




Monday, 27 February 2012

Glen Tarken and her townships 3. Morell Township.

This township is the last that we visit on this trip to this particular Glen at this time and one could consider this to be the main attraction of the day.

Morell Township. C: Author
Walking down to the site from Jerusalem, the site looms into view.  As you approach the site you will walk through a walled fence area that also has the remains on both sides of the wall, both higher and lower to your position on the path. Again, take time to view these sites. As you get closer to the main site, there is a large deer fence that seperates the village from your current position, but a gated styal affords you access to the site.  The deer fence is there for a reason as there are plenty of forestry work and logging taking place at present.

Whilst I was there, I was rewarded with a visit from several deer who made their way through the village. I am never sure as to whether the fence is there to keep them in or out! Upon entering the site, I implore you to stop and take in the views all around you which, on the day that I visited, were breathtaking.


Morell Township: C: Author

Morell Township. C: Author
Morell Township. C: Author

This is a large township that can be traced easily over the area. The buildings, their divisions and layout can easily be identified and distinguished. There are outlines of a large walled sheepfold at the rear right of the site and the remains of a well area to the northeast of the site. Alot of the buidling are almost gone now but it is worth taking time to absorb the site and consider the conditions such an elevated and sloped site must have had on the community living here. The hardships faced to just survive each day.

At the end of your time at the site, you have two options for return. Retracing your steps back along the path to Wester Glen Tarken and the A85 is probably the best. You can walk straight down the hill in front of you, it is steep,but there is a path/track that you will pick up. Here you can also rejoin the disused railway route and turning left picking up the logging road back to the A85. Although this is the shortest route, I would not advise it as the logging work being carried out can be a dangerous area to enter.

2 comments:

  1. Four truly magnificent photographs highlighting the remoteness of this lost township. Can't wait to do the guided tour.

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  2. Thankyou for your comments.

    This tour is one of my most popular ones since this posting. Unfortunately I can't guarantee such great weather every time! I will forward you more details to your email.

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